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The dangerous implications of confusing war with sports

Indian Express – A FIELD DAY: India’s skipper Virat Kohli and teammate MS Dhoni greet each other during the 3rd ODI cricket match against Australia, in Ranchi, earlier this month (PTI Photo/Swapan Mahapatra)
TEN YEARS after Napoleon Bonaparte was defeated at Waterloo (1815) by the British allied forces led by the Duke of Wellington, the Iron Duke was watching a cricket match at his alma mater, Eton College.

Summary

  • A FIELD DAY: India’s skipper Virat Kohli and teammate MS Dhoni greet each other during the 3rd ODI cricket match against Australia, in Ranchi, earlier this month (PTI Photo/Swapan Mahapatra)TEN YEARS after Napoleon Bonaparte was defeated at Waterloo (1815) by the British allied forces led by the Duke of Wellington, the Iron Duke was watching a cricket match at his alma mater, Eton College.
  • The Iron Duke was only encapsulating what most modern militaries believe in: sport is a good preparation for war.
  • In a cricket match between India and Pakistan, every four by Sachin Tendulkar would earn a celebratory LMG burst from one of the Indian posts, which would be replied in equal measure from the other side of LoC for every Wasim Akram wicket.
  • Sport had really become a proxy for war, and the billion-plus spectators in the subcontinent wanted their team to win at any cost.
  • The relationship between sport, spectators and soldiers has come into the spotlight in recent days, when Indian cricketers wore camouflage caps for a match against Australia.


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Written by Cric Editor

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